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Sleeping Beauty Syndrome: Young patient has been sleeping 75 percent of her life for weeks


British woman with Sleeping Beauty Syndrome: 22-year-old spends 75 percent of her life sleeping
Health experts usually advise sleeping seven to eight hours a day. Some people get by much less, others need more. A young British woman not only spends around a third, but around three quarters of her life asleep. She suffers from the so-called "Sleeping Beauty Syndrome".

Woman spends three quarters of her life asleep
More and more people suffer from chronic lack of sleep. Not Beth Goodier from Great Britain. The 22-year-old suffers from the so-called "Little Levin Syndrome" (KLS), which is also colloquially referred to as "Sleeping Beauty Syndrome". She spends around 75 percent of her life sleeping. The rare illness has become a real nightmare for the young woman from Stockport.

22 hours of sleep a day
Actually, it would now be time for Beth Goodier to begin her training as a child psychologist. Because that was exactly what she wanted to do when she was a teenager. But nothing came of it. Because shortly before her 17th birthday, the now 22-year-old fell into a deep sleep and did not wake up for six months, reports the "Daily Mail".

"She slept 22 hours a day, she only went briefly as if in a trance to eat and drink and to use the toilet," said the newspaper. According to her mother, the young woman has been sleeping around 75 percent of the past five years.

Very rare illness
Beth Goodier is one of over 100 young people in the UK diagnosed with Sleeping Beauty Syndrome. "But the name of the fairy tale is far from the gruesome reality that these young people face in the most formative time of their lives," says the newspaper.

According to the information, the young English woman has been in another deep sleep episode for two and a half months. "Nothing - no medication, noise, requests or persuasions - will wake them up," says the newspaper.

The causes have not yet been clarified
“Sleeping Beauty Syndrome” is an extremely rare disease, the prevalence of which is one to two cases per million people. The causes have not yet been clarified, but a genetic origin is often suspected.

Beth Goddier fell asleep one evening and when she woke her mother, she "just babbled, in the tone of a five-year-old". The mother initially thought of a brain tumor or bleeding, but the doctors could not find anything.

Since the young woman had just recovered from tonsillitis, the doctors suspect that this disease - with the genetic predisposition - could have triggered the beginning "Sleeping Beauty Syndrome".

Syndrome often goes away on its own
There are also longer awake times between the recurring phases with a significantly increased need for sleep. However, how long they last is unpredictable. According to experts, it is typical for Kleine Levin syndrome that it gradually disappears over time.

After about ten to 15 years, those affected are "liberated" again, but until then they suffer from unpredictable sleep attacks.

Too tired to go
For Beth Goddier, this means an exhausting and painful time with many restrictions: “I am at an age when I would love to move out. But I can't, because if the disease becomes active, I need my mother's supervision. It's really frustrating, ”she told the BBC years ago.

According to the “Daily Mail”, she has to be taken to a doctor in a wheelchair during her waking phases because she is too tired to walk. "It's like night and day," said her mother Janine. "She could wake up tomorrow and then the race against time begins to live the life she should live. She hurries to meet friends and have her hair done. But nobody knows when she will fall asleep again. "

"It breaks my heart when I see the best years of her life pass," said the mother. But there is a chance that one day Beth Goddier will get well and can enjoy life. (ad)

Author and source information


Video: The Teenager Who Slept For 10 Days: Kleine Levin Syndrome KLS. Medical Documentary. Reel Truth (December 2021).